Tinsley Advertising Wins More Addys than any Miami Agency

It was a great night at the Adrienne Arsht Center in Miami. The Miami Chapter of the Advertising Federation of America gathered to honor the best ads of 2009. It was a record year with over 800 entries. The competition included brands like MTV, Rolling Stone, Royal Caribbean, McDonalds, The Miami Heat, Converse, Ford, Volkswagen, Honda, AT&T, State Farm and Wrangler.

And yet, in this competitive field, we walked away with 37 awards, the most of any agency in Miami.

We won in virtually every major category, for almost every one of our clients.

We would like to thank our clients for believing in us, the judges for their good taste and everyone at Tinsley Advertising for their dedication and hard work.

Here is a list of our 2009 Addys:
Collateral Material
(Annual Report, Color)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Miami Children’s Hospital
Title: 2008 A Report to The Community

Out-Of-Home
(Mass Transit, Interior)
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: The Water is 360º,Year Round
(Mass Transit, Interior)
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Call In And Say You’ve Caught Something
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: This Is How We Roll
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Please Step To The End Of The Line
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Schedule A Play Date With Your Family
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Call In And Say You’re Feeling Green
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Head To Key Largo. It’s Only Natural
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Nova Southeastern University
Title: Going Places? Get An MBA Online

Consumer Or Trade Publication
(Consumer/Trade, Fractional Page, Color)
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County,TDC
Title: More Male Bonding
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County,TDC
Title: A Ghost Tour You Won’t Soon ForgetAward: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County,TDC
Title: Tie One On And Get In A FightAward: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County,TDC
Title: Flaming And Fabulous

Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County,TDC
Title: More Male Bonding, No Boys Allowed & Flaming And Fabulous


Interactive Media

Mobile Marketing
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: There’s No App For This

Internet Commercials
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Cat Cam

Internet Commercials
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: There’s No App For This

Webisodes
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Super Clubs Breezes & Hedonism All-Inclusive Resorts
Title: “What To Wear” , “Broke Bed”, “Good Night John Boy” & “Pool Toys “

Online Campaign
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Your Thermometer, Defrost, Cat Cam & There’s No App For This


Radio

Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Summer Radio


Television

(Local TV Campaign)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Nova Southeastern University
Title: Undergrad, Grad & Financial-Aid

(TV Self-Promotion)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Nova Southeastern University
Title: NSU Business School Image Spot

(National TV, Consumer Products)
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Road To Recovery

(National TV, Consumer Products)
Award:Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Super Clubs Breezes & Hedonism All-Inclusive Resorts
Title: What To Wear

(National TV, Consumer Products)
Award:Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Super Clubs Breezes & Hedonism All-Inclusive Resorts
Title: Broken Bed

(National TV, Consumer Products)
Award:Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: There’s No APP For This

(National TV Campaign)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: “Cat Cam”, “Go Green”, & ” Road To Recovery”

(National TV Campaign)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Miami Children’s Hospital
Title: Perfect Fit “Guitar”, Perfect Fit “Sandwich”


Mixed/Multiple Media

(Mixed-Media, National Consumer)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Road To Recovery


Advertising For The Arts & Sciences

(Arts, Magazine)
Award; Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Portrait Of An Artist

(Arts, Magazine)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Product Of Our Environment

(Arts, Out-Of-Home)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Nova Southeastern University
Title: Bansky Outdoor Board for Ft.Lauderdale Museum of Art


Public Service

(Public Service, TV)
Award; Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: NOAA
Title: Don’t Feed The Wild Dolphins

(Public Service, Interactive)
Award: Gold Addy® Award
Advertiser: NOAA
Title: Don’t Feed The Wild Dolphins


Elements Of Advertising

(Music Only)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Road To Recovery

(Music Only)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Go Green

(Music With Lyrics)
Award: Silver Addy® Award
Advertiser: Monroe County, TDC
Title: Cat Cam

Digital Detritus

by Dorn Martell

digital-ditritus

We have a room at our agency filled with fairly new, obsolete electronic devices. It seems that we live in an age of almost immediate obsolescence. There are monitors that cost more to ship than they are worth. Printers that are cheaper to replace, than to buy new ink. Piles of peripherals read like layers of techno archeology; the Syquest era, the Zip layer, the Jazz era, all as useless as the media that fed them. We even bought a state-of-the-art HD DVD player only to watch the market shift to Blu-Ray.

The effect of this is more that just the environmental costs of plastics and heavy metals in landfills. It leads to a sense of impermanence and an over-emphasis on “the shiny new object”. Software developers tend to overly “trick-out” new versions just so it appears radically different from the old version.

I recently got rid of a perfectly good phone to get the new Droid. I actually felt bad for my abandoned little Razor. CRT TVs, once the focal point of American family life, are kicked to the curb and replaced with plasmas that are replaced by LCDs which are replaced by LEDs that will be replaced by new 3D TVs (or some version of netTV).

The battle of the mega-pixels seems to have reached a stalemate as the average household has multiple digital cameras with twice the resolution of just a few years ago and at an average price of $150 the industry has nowhere to go.

The “Splinternet effect” will soon force Nooks and Kindles to have a deathmatch with the iPad and the last tablet standing will be the one with the corner on the content market.

Which leads to an interesting conclusion. Content is still the last frontier for innovation. Regardless of the platform, content creation and intellectual property ownership will be the deciding factor for all technology. All of these items are just “dumb machines” that only come to life when they are infused with human ideas.

Measuring Tweets

by Gio Gutierrez

Latest stats from the Twitter Blog:

As a member of the Twitter analytics team, part of my job is to measure and understand growth. The graph above tells a story of how we’ve grown over the past three years in terms of number of tweets created per day. Please note that tweets from accounts identified as spam have been removed so the counts in this chart do not include spam.

Folks were tweeting 5,000 times a day in 2007. By 2008, that number was 300,000, and by 2009 it had grown to 2.5 million per day. Tweets grew 1,400% last year to 35 million per day. Today, we are seeing 50 million tweets per day—that’s an average of 600 tweets per second. (Yes, we have TPS reports.)

Tweet deliveries are a much higher number because once created, tweets must be delivered to multiple followers. Then there’s search and so many other ways to measure and understand growth across this information network. Tweets per day is just one number to think about. We’ll make time to share more information so please stay tuned.

Smooth Sailing in a Rough Travel Market

by John Underwood

The Florida Keys & Key West continue to see occupancy rate increases despite the tough times in the current travel market. According to Smith Travel Research, The Keys have seen a boost in occupancy rates for 2009 at 70.3%. In fact, the destination was the only Florida travel market to show an increase for the year. The Keys also had the highest average daily rate in the state ($171.51) and the highest RevPar (revenue per available room). This is great news for both Tinsley Advertising and The Florida Keys & Key West. A desirable destination, a true partnership and unique & innovative marketing make a great mix for a successful tourism campaign. One that has won numerous awards and that we are proud to represent. See Smith Travel Research stats below:

 

Top Occupancy Occ 2009
Florida Keys 70.3
Miami-Hialeah, FL 65.2
Fort Lauderdale, FL 63.4
Orlando, FL 60.7
Top ADR ADR 2009
Florida Keys 171.51
Miami-Hialeah, FL 140.73
West Palm Beach-Boca Raton, FL 127.81
Fort Myers, FL 123.96

The Supreme Court And Media Cost

by Scott Sussman

In a 5-4 Supreme Court ruling last week, corporations will now be allowed to contribute unlimited funds to political campaigns. Corporations can also run their own political ads for the candidate they support. No matter what your personal belief is on this issue, it will have a direct impact on the cost to purchase television time. Admittedly, this may not be the first thing you think of when reading about this decision, unless you are a media buyer. During every election, candidates gobble up huge blocks of ad time. If possible and marketing conditions permitting, Tinsley Advertising tries to avoid these time periods. While it was not the intent of the high court to drive up the cost of television time, it will have that direct effect. This will especially affect Florida, Ohio and New York; states that usually have competitive elections. October and November will be interesting periods to watch from a media cost perspective.